Monday, February 23, 2015

Personal Branding for Startup Founders – A Practical Guide

Did you know that the “About Us” section is the second most viewed page after the home page for most of the websites? Today, when a lot is being talked about creating the company brand and image, it is equally important to have a strong personal brand of the founders – this is especially true for startups because for many startups, the founders, CEOs and the people behind the company are more known than the company itself.

Think of Apple. Think of Microsoft. Think of Google. Although these are large organizations, there are some strong personalities which come to our mind when we think of these companies – Steve Jobs, Bill Gates, Larry Page and Sergey Brin. We don’t ‘live’ in a virtual world – we live in a world where we speak with humans, we build relationships with people and we engage with people. So it is very important that founders think of their personal branding very seriously.

But how do I go about it?” – I get it asked many times. So rather than preaching more about why it is important (I am hoping that you are already convinced!), here are some practical ways of leveraging some of the popular social media platforms for building your personal brand.

LinkedIn
If you have to choose one platform, choose LinkedIn. It is THE most important professional networking platform. First and foremost, it is crucial that you have a well-developed LinkedIn profile. It should very crisply and clearly list your education, experience, expertise, passions and likings. There are lot of articles available online on how to create a powerful LinkedIn profile, the do’s and don’ts and best practices. Follow the advice there. If you think you don’t have time or expertise to write a killer LinkedIn profile, take external help – but do it. It’s mandatory.

You cannot stop after creating a LinkedIn profile. You should aim for following
-          Post at least one status update every week – this could be about your company, your offerings, an interesting insight, your views about industry updates and so on. This is important for being in front of your connections.
-          Join relevant groups which interest you and start getting active there through participation in ongoing discussions.
-          Occasionally, start ask thought provoking questions and elicit responses.
-          Leverage LinkedIn Publisher platform - It allows you to write long updates or articles. You can use this platform to demonstrate your expertise or knowledge.



Twitter
No, Twitter is not for kids or for people who don’t have any work. Twitter is gaining popularity and is being used as a prime network, even in B2B segment, for news, updates and information sharing. It’s a myth that Twitter is time consuming. You don’t need to have Twitter app in ‘always on’ mode on your smartphone. There are schedulers such as Bufferapp or Hootsuite which you can use to schedule your tweets. You can choose to share interesting industry updates, your opinions on latest topics, news about your company products or services. You could also appreciate your employees and motivate them. You can join ongoing conversations through hashtags. It is easy to create an image of a curator of interesting information or opinion-maker on Twitter. Don’t hesitate to show your personal side by way of some casual updates about your vacation or personal interests like
photography, poetry or sports.



Blog
You obviously have lot of knowledge about your industry and domain or technology. Use blogs to share that knowledge and demonstrate your thought leadership or expertise to the world. Based on my personal experience, finalizing the blog topic is the most difficult task. What I do is, pick up the pain points of my customers and write a purely educational post around that. Try it, and it might work for you as well. Don’t try to sell your product or services through your blogs. Genuinely solve people’s problems or provide answers to their questions. A blog written in a simple language which honestly provides relevant and useful information is always appreciated. If your customers approach you after reading your blog, they will approach you as knowledge partner and not as just another vendor.



Pinterest
Yes! Don’t be surprised to see it listed here. Pinterest can very well be used for personal branding – here is how. Suppose you run an exclusive boutique or a cafe, there is no better place than Pinterest to showcase your passion, products and services.  It’s very visual, the interface is very cool and most likely, and your target audience is already on Pinterest! You could also pin other interesting stuff like your office photos, customer testimonials, the books you like, your favorite vacation spots - flaunt your creative side and pin about your passions. There is no harm in showcasing your personal interest on social networking sites.



Quora
If your knowledge of Quora is limited to the email notifications you receive when someone “follows” you there, then it’s time to change it. Quora is a brilliant platform for personal brand building. It is increasingly becoming popular and it seems to be favored by search engines too! Lot of discussions (yes, serious discussions) happen on Quora. Since it is a question and answer format, if you have a point of view about something or have some good pointers to share, there is no better place than Quora. Join interesting conversations and respond to questions. Occasionally, your responses could be supplemented with the blog articles which you have written – I have seen examples where people have seen a steady flow of traffic to their blog coming from Quora.



As we know, Personal Branding is nothing but creating a right kind of emotional response when people hear your name, see you online or meet you in person. Ensure that they find consistency everywhere J Always make sure that your offline persona matches with your online image.

Monday, January 5, 2015

#Startups – Your Social Media Questions are Answered Here!

The Year 2014 has been great for me and my company MidasTouch. We won awards, we got a chance to work with some amazing new companies and we launched some new offerings – especially for startups.

Based on several interactions with startups, I can clearly see that startups not only understand the importance of social media but also want to do something concrete and substantial on social media, which can deliver them definite business outcomes.



There are some common questions which I hear often. Here I have tried to answer those -

1.     There are 700+ social media platforms - which one is right for me?
It is quite natural to feel overwhelmed by the choice of tools and technologies. I see that many founders and startups feel that it is important to “create a presence” on as many platforms as possible. A point to note here is “creating a presence” does not mean creating an account. Having an account which is completely inactive creates a worse impression than having no account. The choice of platform should depend on the answers to these questions – a) Where does your target audience hang out? and b) What do you want to achieve? For example: A B2B software services company, LinkedIn and Twitter become valid choices. Whereas; perhaps for a restaurant, Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest will make more sense. 

2.     Is content marketing for me?
Content marketing is for everyone. More than “should I go for it?” you need to start thinking “how well should I do it?”. Lot of companies are not even aware of the vast knowledge bank which exists within the company itself. As a starting point for your content marketing strategy, think about extracting that knowledge and present it in a readable and promotable format. You don’t need to jump to whitepapers and eBooks in the very first month - blog is a great place to start with.

3.     Does social media work for B2B?
Absolutely it does! Have a look at my earlier detailed post on this. More importantly, you can derive ROI from your B2B social media marketing efforts too. The key lies in defining a solid social media strategy – which includes defining the goals you want to achieve, selecting the right platforms, defining the right strategy for social media posts, constantly measuring the results and refining the strategy based on feedback and results.

4.     Will social media help me get 10 customers?
Why not? Let us consider following examples:
-          Example 1: Recently, while browsing my Facebook timeline, I saw a friend of mine had liked a post from a dance class. I immediately dialed the number of the dance class and joined the batch. Technically, the dance class got a new customer through Facebook.
-          Example 2: You are representing a software services company. In one of the groups on LinkedIn, you noticed an interesting conversation and participate in that. You put forward your point of view. Through those interactions, you connect with another member of the group and that leads you to a new customer.
-          Example 3: You have posted an amazing blog which is liked and shared widely across social media channels. The blog convinces one of your prospects about your expertise and that’s how he contacts you.
Do you notice a commonality here? Through social media, you get an opportunity to facilitate or influence the decisions. That’s how you get new customers. Don’t compare it with phone calls based or email-based push mechanism.

5.     Should I spend on ads?
The first question you need to really ask yourself is what do you want to achieve through ads? Ads are available on different platforms such as Facebook, Google or LinkedIn. Based on your objectives and goals, you can choose the right platform and decide on the budget. For quicker conversions, ads are great. Ads also work best for specific things like events, whitepapers or specific time-bound offers.

6.     How important is the personal brand of founders?
Based on my personal experience, I can confidently say that till your startup brand becomes bigger, the brand of the founder is very important – especially for services startups. The value of services is seen only after it is consumed. So to create the comfort level in the minds of the customers, it is important for them to know who are the people behind, their backgrounds, and why they should trust your company.

7.     Can it help me in hiring the best talent?
First, ask yourself this question – why would someone want to work with you? It is the cutting-edge technology, your awesome infrastructure, the people in your company, the learning environment, opportunities or innovation. Once you know that, showcase that on your social media channels. In today’s time and age, candidates make a decision about joining a company not only based on the job description but also based on the overall image of the company on social media channels. Make sure you create the right impression and hiring the best talent should not be a problem for you.

8.     How do I define the frequency of the posts or updates
Very basic but very important question. Should I post 3 tweets or 10 tweets? How many Facebook updates should go every day? How many times should I post a company page update on LinkedIn? Should I write 2 blogs a week or 1 blog a day? Well, well – again, it depends. You are on social media to engage with your customers and prospects so you will need to define the frequency and tone of your communication based on that. If your customers are based in the US, no point in tweeting 10 times during India time. You need to be aware of all such nuances. As a thumb-rule, I would say start small but be consistent. If you decide to post 3 tweets per day- do it every day! Consistency is more important.

9.     Is it okay to schedule posts?  
Why not? As a startup, it is quite natural that you are constrained on bandwidth and it is also obvious that you can’t be omnipresent. So you can certainly use tools like HootSuite or Bufferapp to schedule your posts. Just be careful that any time-sensitive posts should not appear irrelevant because of being posted at a wrong time. There have been instances when a social media intern posted a scheduled tweet about a conference happening in full swing when the conference had to be cancelled at the last moment. Make sure that such things don’t happen with you. Follow sensitivity on social media.

10.In house or agency?
Nobody knows your business better than you. Do know that you need to be closely involved with the social media efforts for your startup. It is not something which you can just hand over to someone and forget about it. To make it effective, you need to be as much involved in it. If you have the bandwidth and skills to do it in-house, would recommend going with that option. But don’t call me biased if I tell the advantages of an agency such as - expert skills, experience and continuity to the efforts. Just like our body needs a specialist doctor, probably your startup also needs a specialist to take care of the crucial aspect of social media initially and once you get a hang of it, you can take it over in-house.

In case any more questions come to your mind, don’t hesitate to drop me an email.


Social4Startups

This article was originally published on YourStory

Monday, August 18, 2014

Did You (also) Believe these Myths about Content Marketing?

Content marketing allows businesses to connect with prospects and customers. Content marketing is hot and buzzing in the marketing world. Everyone is talking about content marketing. Content marketing is the gasoline for your social media marketing efforts ----Arrrrghh…you have heard all of this but still we all do know that it’s a fairly new phenomenon and it’s quite natural that there are quite a few misconceptions around content marketing – how to do it, what makes it more effective and what are the best practices.

At our agency, Midas Touch, we work with several businesses, in various industry verticals, and assist them with their content marketing efforts. Through our learning of last few years, we thought of listing some common myths about Content Marketing and also provide some rational explanation around those.

Myth 1: Blogs are the only ‘valid’ form of content
Undoubtedly, blogs are important. They can definitely serve as backbone to your content marketing strategy. Blogs are also excellent medium to communicate with your target audience. But don’t commit the mistake of thinking of blogs as only valid form of content. 

Don’t forget to incorporate other equally important forms of content in your strategy. These could include – eNewsletters, videos, case studies, eBooks, whitepapers, infographics, podcasts, webinar recordings or even memes! Such nuggets of content can be very effective in reaching out to your target audience through various social media platforms.

Myth 2: Anyone can write, so anybody can handle content marketing
Finding good writers is key to your content marketing strategy. Don’t go for the lowest
bidder because low cost can have a serious impact on quality. Good quality content writing requires not only language skills but also business senses, creativity and domain understanding.

Myth 3: Content marketing is same as SEO or Social Media
SEO used to be heavily dependent on the content aka keywords. But not anymore. Now search engines have started giving heavy importance to answers to specific questions and therefore the quality and depth of the content is more important than keyword stuffing. Undoubtedly, high quality content will definitely help in the organic searches for your website but don’t base your content marketing strategy based on SEO requirements. Similarly, social media should be used as a tool to disseminate the content to right target audience and remember, if you don’t have content, you won’t be able to share anything on social media. 

Myth 4: Content Marketing does not have any direct RoI
Depends on your definition of RoI. Good quality content is a very effective way to engage with your target audience. Conversations are also valid Return on the Investment of sharing the content. You get more brand awareness, customer connection, customer retention, and customer loyalty. And these, and more such factors, are not quantifiable in numbers and therefore can be construed as “no ROI”.  Every piece of content is different and based on the intent. The content which is written for sharing and commenting cannot be used for lead generation – that’s a grossly wrong use of content.

Myth 5: Content marketing is about Your Products/ Services
In fact, it is NOT about your products and services. Your brochure and other collateral is not content marketing. Well, content marketing has to be about and related to your business but it cannot be 100% about your business – then you are doing injustice in the name of content marketing. Today, people are searching for solutions to their problems. If your content offers them that, then you have a winner in hand. Try to provide educational and thought leadership content which will establish you as expert in your field and establish your image of a trusted partner.

Did I miss any? Drop a comment and I will include it in this article – with credits to you! :-) 

Saturday, August 2, 2014

Getting beyond “ROI” to Measure the True Benefits of Social Media

According to a recent survey conducted by Decipher on behalf of the Word of Mouth Marketing Association and the American Marketing Association, 70% of the markets anticipate that in the year 2014, their companies will increase social media spending.

Social media is no more an option today. It solely is a matter of how effectively and creatively brands adapt this medium. Yes, it is very powerful and at the same time, it’s very tricky – I am saying tricky because social media marketing is becoming more and more complex. Everyone is talking social, every online website wants “social integration”, the number of social platforms is growing, social is within the reach of every smartphone holder, there is tons of data and there are hundreds of metrics to track. 

Brands have been spending on marketing since ages and understand the power of ‘being in front of’ the target audience and grabbing the eye balls. I believe what adds a little complexity in social media is the fact that there are certain aspects like clicks, visits to the websites, fans, followers etc., which can be very easily quantified and therefore there is always a temptation to link “RoI” with these quantifiable aspects and completely miss out on other qualitative aspects.

“What do you want to measure the “social” or the “media --- says David Alston of Radian6. Doesn’t it make you think about the true definition of RoI when it comes to social media? It definitely should - because the “Media” aspect is quantitative andSocial” aspect is qualitative.

Let me try and explain what I mean by this. Quantitative RoI means anything which can be measured in numbers – such as Number of visits to your site, number of leads, Increase in sales/ revenue, number of fans, followers, RTs, shares etc. Qualitative RoI is something which has very high qualitative value associated with it but it is hard measure it in number – this could include things like Interactions, Feedback, Loyalty, Trust, Passion or Brand Awareness.

Here are some of the examples of brands deriving qualitative and quantitative RoI through social media.

QUANTITATIVE RoI:
  • Southwest Airlines: Southwest Airlines attributes more than $1 million in additional ticket sales to its presence on Twitter
  • Marriott: Marriott has made more than $5 million in bookings from people who clicked through to the reservation page from Marriott's blog.
  • Dell: Dell Outlet made more than $6.5M sale through its Twitter presence.
  • Lenovo: Lenovo attributed a 20% reduction in call center activity to use of a community website for answers
  • Naked Pizza: 68.60% of total dollar sales came from customers who said they are “calling from Twitter”
  • Blendtec: Increased sales 5x by running the humorous "Will it Blend" Videos on YouTube.
  • AT&T Community: 21,000 customer queries were resolved through the community tremendous reduction in call volume
  • IBM: The developerWorks community saves $100 million annually with people connecting on the community instead of contacting IBM support.
  • Accenture:  Accenture is believed to have saved thousands of dollars per executive by using LinkedIn for recruitment instead of headhunters. 

QUALITATIVE RoI:
  • Starbucks: Generated lot of new product ideas by asking users what want from Starbucks.
  • Oracle: Trained 25,000 partners using social media which in turn not only reduced the costs but also boosted satisfaction and increased PR.
  • TurboTax: The Twitter campaign to respond and answer questions during key tax season established the company as thought leader in the space and found that customers were 71% more likely to recommend TurboTax.
  • Kogi Korean BBQ: Uses Twitter to let the customers know where the truck was and when it would be in their neighborhood which built a strong connect with the consumers.
  • Home Depot: Appreciates technical support employees on Twitter through tagging (Moral boosting, unique appreciation)
To summarize, here are few things you can remember about social media ROI:
  • Quantity is not always the only metric – 5 engaged followers are better than 500 non-active followers
  • Quality of interactions is crucial - 1 RT from an influencer can have much better impact than impressions to 1000 inactive ‘accounts’
  • Conversation is as important as conversion – Social media offers an opportunity for two-way communication and brands should definitely leverage it for building connections with the target audience
  • Negative comments also deliver RoI – provided you act on them in a right fashion. For example: If a brand properly handles negative comments from an irate customer on social media, other connected users automatically have a positive impression about the brand in their mind.
  • Advertising cannot tell you consumer sentiment but social media can –use social media for such things and that’s RoI for you!
This article was originally published in afaqs special report on social media. Download the complete report here.

Wednesday, April 2, 2014

B2B Social Media - Doing it the Right Way

A lot is being written about social media and its applicability in B2B context. There are contrasting views about how B2B social media should be done, what is the ROI, do the rules change and so on.

In this article which I recently wrote for afaqs!, the number one website in Asia-Pac for Advertising, Media & Marketing professionals, I have described how B2B social media can be more effective, what are the things to look out for and how a strong content strategy and integrated approach can go a long way.



Thursday, February 20, 2014

Exciting Times for Midas Touch - Award and Rapid Expansion Plans

The Year 2014 has started great for Midas Touch. Last year kept us super busy – of course for good reasons. Let me share the exciting news which made the last few months so thrilling.

On 13th Feb this year, Midas Touch won the award for “Best B2B Social Media Agency”. The award is conferred by ABP News and The Global Youth Marketing Forum. Midas Touch is the only agency to win the award in B2B Social Media category and we are the only agency to have won it for the second consecutive year. Yay - celebration time!! A BIG Thank You to all our customers, partners and employees for their faith and support.





Last year, Sanjeev Nambudiri came on board of Midas Touch as Co-Founder. Sanjeev comes with 22+ years of vast experience in sales and business development. As Sanjeev refers to himself, he is a recent but committed convert to the role that marketing & social media can play in growing sales and differentiation and sees a bright future for organizations willing to apply these methods. 

And finally, I am super pleased to announce the launch of our new website. Check out www.i-midastouch.com. The new website boasts swanky design, cool UI and more clearly depicts our positioning. Do share your feedback on how you like the new site.

Once again thank everyone – my Twitter friends, LinkedIn connections and you - the super cool blog readers :) 

Monday, January 13, 2014

3 Ways to Increase your Facebook Organic Page Reach

Towards the end of the year 2013, Facebook gave millions of brands a “not so good” New Year gift. Facebook changed its algorithm in such a way that brands observed a severe drop in the organic reach for their Facebook pages.  

Facebook bluntly ‘advised’ the brands to pay for ads if they want to reach out to ‘their own’ fans. Social media marketers and page admins were obviously very unhappy about this. To start with, brands already spent a lot of money in acquiring the fans through ads in a hope to reach out to and engage with a wide array of audience only to realize now that even to reach out to that audience, one would need to pay extra.

Although promoting individual posts seem like an obvious option, we were trying to find out ways of increasing the organic reach of the page updates – without having to pay ANY additional money to Facebook.

So here I share 3 awesome tips which will help you increase the organic reach of your Facebook page updates - absolutely FREE, without having to pay Facebook for that.

#1: Publish Text Updates

I know, I know – the good thing about Facebook is the visual impact and it offers you opportunity to attract attention of your fans through stunning visuals. But do you know that a text update has more reach than an update with a picture? Engagement might be low but the reach will surely be more.

I have noticed that for some pages, the reach of a text status update is almost 1000% more than a picture update! Can you beat that? Yes, it does sound very irrational and illogical, but it is true. Try it!



#2: Publish Albums

Another thing which has worked awesomely well for us is Facebook albums. Next time you post a status update, include more than 1 image. Even if you include 2 or 3 images, you will see significant increase in the organic reach of your post.

You can think of lot of creative ways of creating albums and reach out to more fans on your page.

#3: Post frequently when the fans are online

Facebook Insights is a real great thing which Facebook has introduced – provided you know how to use it well.  The Insights shows you the time when your page fans are online. You can keep a note of that and post your updates at that time.


  
You can plan to post multiple updates in a day – at the time when your fans are online – and start seeing more organic reach. The concept is simple, if you post your updates when the fans are online, it is more likely to appear on their timeline and the fans are more likely to interact with your updates (of course, your updates need to be engaging)

Are there any more tips which have worked well for you? Share the learnings – after all, social media is all about sharing knowledge and learning from each other :-)

Monday, October 28, 2013

Crisis Management using Social Media – Buffer Case Study

On Saturday, I received an email with subject “Buffer has been hacked – here is what’s going on”. As an ardent Buffer fan and user, my first reaction was “Oh my god. What must have happened to my tweets/ Facebook posts?”. But when I opened the email, I was up for a pleasant surprise. Yes, I am saying a “pleasant surprise”. Here is why:

#1: The email did not beat around the bush but clearly stated the fact that buffer has been hacked and it’s a problem which needs to be handled. At the same time, the language and tone clearly showed that the Buffer team was concerned and apologetic about what happened. While things can go wrong with anyone, finally taking the ownership makes or breaks the deal.

 

  
#2: The email clearly stated what needs to be done next – which is most important.


#3: While the Buffer team was working round the clock for solving the problem, it made sure that team members were posting constant updates on their live blog, Facebook and Twitter. Having worked on software products for a considerable period in my career, I can fully understand how difficult it must be for the team to handle the issues and solve the technical problems. But at the same time, they made sure that they don’t keep the users in dark. I was amazed to see updates almost after every couple of hours.  The frequency of the updates clearly showed that the team was working round the clock over the weekend to take care of this crisis.



#4: Here is what completely amazed and blew me away. I posted a tweet congratulating the buffer team for their excellent crisis management and I got a personalized response. Note that buffer has 145K followers and I can only imagine the flood of mentions it must have got after the hacking incident. Responding to each tweet – that too in a so much personalized manner in incredible!

The personalized signature at the end of the tweet from Buffer team made me look at their “About Us” section to know really who the members are. What increased my respect for the team is the fact that the buffer team is only 13 people and the people who responded to my tweet did not necessarily belong to “marketing” or “social media” department. Belle is the Content Crafter there and Brian is the Designer!  Yet again, a fine example to emphasize the fact that marketing is no more confined to marketing department.




Key takeaways from this:
-          In case of crisis like this, be honest and transparent. Show the concern and at the same time, accept and take complete responsibility
-          Communicate the updates and tell the affected community that you are working on it
-          Social Media is a powerful channel – while you enjoy publishing news and achievements there, it can very well be used in such situations as well  
-          Social media is not ONLY marketing department job. The whole buffer team, right from the CEO to the Designer, all of them were on social channel, responding to queries, feedback and appreciations.
-          Give a personal touch to your social media presence– to be honest, the personalized response to my tweet made me write this blog post!


Have you witnessed any other fine example of crisis management using social media? Share your comments!

Friday, August 30, 2013

Brands Paying Heavy Price for Social Media Insensitivity

Yes, social media undoubtedly offers a great way to brands to connect with the consumers, build emotional rapport and have a more personalized connection with them. And when we talk about emotional connection, it is important that the brands remain sensitive about what they publish on social media.

Here are examples of some social media disasters where brands had to pay a heavy price for being insensitive on social media.

#1: Chipotle Mexican Grill

Recently Chipotle faked its Twitter hack. 


Undoubtedly, it got the attention from public. The number of followers increased – but are they really the people who want to engage with the brand? I doubt. The supposedly hacked tweets got thousands of RTs. But are these creating any value for the brand or for the audience? Not at all!

I firmly believe and continue to reiterate that brands need to look at quality of conversations and engagement through social media – rather than the numbers like followers and RTs only.

I am sure ardent fans of Chipotle certainly did not appreciate this stunt and somewhere the trust was shaken.  

#2:  Volkswagen India

Volkswagen India did a “vibrating newspaper” ad in leading newspapers across India. Indeed an innovation – it became the talk of the Twitter town and blogosphere. Positive and negative comments started pouring in. Volkswagen unfortunately was not prepared to handle the attention.

There were many tweets about the vibrating newspaper not being appreciated. In response to that (probably as a defense), Volkswagen India tweeted “Women would be dumb to call it a vibrator. Or maybe they do not understand real driving experience. #PunIntended #Volkswagen #Creative”.

Obviously such sexist tweet was retweeted many times and received lot of backlashing. Volkswagen deleted the tweet and all the ReTweets. But the following screenshot, taken by Nandita remained and that will continue to remind people about the insensitivity shown by Volkswagen. Yes, Volkswagen responded after more than 3 days that its Twitter handle was compromised and they are looking into it – but is anybody in the mood to listen?

(Via Social Samosa)
Mistakes happen but brands really need to learn handling negative comments on social media. Deleting the tweet or post is NOT an option.

#3: Hyundai

In April 2013, Hyundai released an ad for British market depicting a man attempting suicide by suffocating himself with exhaust fumes inside his Hyundai car. But he fails because the Hyundai ix35 fuel cell car emits only water vapor. 


While the ad makers were patting their backs when The Drum magazine named it as Ad of the Week, something happened - A few days after the ad was released, an advertising copywriter in London posted a blog post in which she posted the suicide note of her father who had committed suicide in exactly the same manner.

The blog post immediately went viral – and the ad became viral for all the wrong reasons. Hyundai did tweet an apology and withdrew the ad. But the copies of the ad were already out on YouTube and other channels. How to handle the crisis is a different story, but I think suicide should not be promoted in advertising in any way. Period.

#4: KFC, Thailand

In April 2012, after an earthquake of 8.5 Richter at the coast of Indonesia, the whole Thailand was watching tsunami warnings and was fearing the worst. At such time, KFC Thailand thought of ‘cashing’ on it and posted on its Facebook wall:

“Let’s hurry home and follow the earthquake news. And don’t forget to order your favorite KFC menu.

Such insensitive post, on the company Facebook wall, was obviously not appreciated by the people who were associated with the brand on Facebook. When thousands of people lost their lives in Tsunami, all this food chain could think of was its Chicken. Although the post was taken down later on, it had done the damage.

#
5: American Apparel

In October 2012, when Sandy Hurricane hit the East Coast of United States and was creating havoc in that part of the country, the leading retailer American Apparel thought that it could cash on this by offering ‘discounts’ to people!

(Via Forbes)

Along with a very ‘helpful map’, American Apparel sent out an email announcing 20% discount for 36 hours for the customers in Connecticut, Massachusetts, Maryland, North Carolina, New Jersey, Delaware, New York, Virginia and Pennsylvania.

Unsurprisingly, the Twitterati backlashed it in a big way – to the extent where people announced on Twitter about them boycotting the American Apparel stores. The damage was irreversible. 
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